SLEEP AND TEENS

A Good Night’s Sleep Has a Great Effect on Your Teen’s Health

9

HOURS


the average amount of sleep
a teen needs each night.

28%

of teens fall asleep
at school once a
week or more.

14%

of teens arrive late for
school at least once a
week or more.

WHY SLEEP IS IMPORTANT

Zzz’s Can Lead to A’s

Sleep helps your ability to listen, concentrate,
remember, learn, and solve problems.

Good Mood

Lack of sleep can lead to moodiness,
irritability, and depression.

Keeps You Physically Healthy

Sleep allows your body to repair itself.
Lack of sleep can lead to a poor complexion,
and increase your obesity risk.

COMMON SLEEP DISORDERS

Sleep Deprivation

A disorder resulting from early school start times, long
homework hours and extracurricular activities creating
busy schedules and not enough time for sleep.

Inadequate Sleep Hygiene

Poor sleep habits which include using electronics
at bedtime, eating late / drinking caffeine,
and not keeping a regular sleep schedule.

Circadian Rhythm Disorder

(Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome) A disorder in which there is a continuous or occasional disruption of sleep patterns caused by changes in a teen's biological clock as they go through puberty.

TIPS FOR BETTER SLEEP

Establish a bedtime routine.

Keep the bedroom cool, dark, and quiet.

Don't eat, drink, or exercise before bed.

MOST IMPORTANTLY: Turn off all electronic devices.

The body produces melatonin at night to induce sleep. Bright lights from electronic devices signal the brain to suppress melatonin production, causing sleep problems.

Sources: Dr. Anita Bhola, Montefiore Nyack Hospital; National Sleep Foundation, sleepfoundation.org; WebMD.com; Medical News Today, medicalnewstoday.com